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Stupid Rules: No Video Review for Goalie Interference

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After watching some questionable goals being scored during the regular season and during the 2014 Stanley Cup Playoffs, I believe it's time for the NHL to have the ability to challenge calls made by on the on-ice officials. More specifically, there needs to be a video review process for goalie interference. One way to accomplish this would be via the coach's challenge.

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Good Afternoon Wilderness! Today I am going to talk briefly about the coach's challenge.

After watching some questionable goals being scored during the regular season and during the 2014 Stanley Cup Playoffs, I believe it's time for the NHL to have the ability to challenge calls made by on the on-ice officials. More specifically, there needs to be a video review process for goalie interference. One way to accomplish this would be via the coach's challenge.

Let's set the table for you. Game two of the Stanley Cup Finals, L.A. Kings forward Dwight King makes significant contact with New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist, and tips a point shot from L.A. Kings defenseman Matt Greene past Lundqvist to make the game 4-3.

In my opinion, this was goalie interference and the goal in question shouldn't have counted. A simple review of the replay would have confirmed this. This goal should have been waved off, and King should have been given a two-minute penalty for goalie interference. Obviously, the Rangers were upset with the play.

Former NHL referee Kerry Fraser said that this was a violation of NHL Rule 69.1. Some have suggested that New York Rangers defenseman Ryan McDonough checked King into Lundqvist, but Fraser debunks that theory as well.

Following their initial contact, King played off McDonough to the inside and then slipped laterally into the blue paint and toward Lundqvist. King then made a movement independent (separation) of McDonough with a backward press deeper into the crease and a resulting lateral ‘skate hop' that initiated solid contact with the Rangers goalie. The resulting tumble caused King to land on the right pad of Lundqvist inside the crease. This action took place as Lundqvist was attempting to remain square and set for a shot from the point that King was ultimately given credit for deflecting past the Ranger goalkeeper.

I usually don't read Damien Cox's work, but he does make a good point in a blog post that he wrote this past week. I like Cox's point about the coach's challenge, if the NFL can get it right, the NHL can too.

Damien Cox, The Spin - And the notion of a coach's challenge for replay review, a concept he's championed for several years, is suddenly more popular than ever.

"Now people are seeing what happens in a critical game and a critical situation that can cost people jobs," he said today.

"Why not? It works in the NFL."

Expanding the use of video review and giving coaches the opportunity to challenge calls are both likely to be hot topics this week, including today at the competition committee and Wednesday when the GMs meet.

If it were up to Tallon, coaches would be able to challenge both goalie interference calls and offside plays leading to goals, neither of which currently can be reviewed.

"I'm saying one time per game, one goal, one time per coach," he said. "That's it. It's not going to happen that often.

Based on what we have seen recently, I think we could make the argument that it's time for the NHL to have a coach's challenge. More specifically, there's no reason why the NHL shouldn't be able to review goalie interference.

According to TSN's Bob McKenzie, coach's challenge is likely to be instituted next year, but there won't be a challenge for goalie interference. In my opinion, that's unacceptable, the NHL is the best hockey league in the world, but even their officials are human.  Time to have video review for goalie interference. Thoughts?